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Monday, May 28, 2012

Tokyo Architecture In LEGO

I have no idea who sent me these pictures of LEGO constructs, but they certainly are awesome.

I did do a lot of research on them, however, because I do recognize the architecture (I like architecture).

Constructed entirely of LEGO, the top photo is of the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building also known as Tokyo City Hall (東京都庁舎 Tōkyō-to Chōsha).

To show you the type of accuracy involved, here's the real building below:

Markus Leupold-Löwenthal took this photo in 2005 of the real building.
Pretty freaking awesome LEGO build, eh? 

The real building is situated in the Shinjuku district Tokyo and between 1991 to 2006 was the tallest building in the city, coming in at a height of 243 meters (799 feet).

Below, is the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building beside the Tokyo Tower - also in LEGO!


You can see how big the the models are!

Tokyo Tower (left) and Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building (right) made out of LEGO building blocks.


The real Tokyo Tower (東京タワー Tōkyō tawā) was built in 1958 and stands an impressive 333 meters (1,091 feet) high and was, until recently the tallest structure in Japan (now the Tokyo Skytree that opened up earlier this month) (I'll get to it!). Located in Shibuya Park, Minato district of Tokyo, this Eiffel Tower look-alike is a communications and observation tower.

Here's a photo of the real Tokyo Tower for comparison purposes.


Regular readers know I love constructing things out of LEGO with my six-year-old son, Hudson - though I must admit I have my own building agenda.

My deal is feudal Japan. 

I have two projects on the go right now and am awaiting the time to photograph one of them (Japanese castle), and am awaiting the proper inspiration on how I am populating the other (temple atop mountain).

Other plans include a samurai duel a la The Seven Samurai, and building a siege weapon - Japanese style and then having it attack something.

That's all for now... I hope you enjoyed the pictures.

Cheers,
Andrew Joseph    
 




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