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Monday, October 8, 2018

So Long, And Thanks For All The Fish

Finally. I've been writing about this off and on for years, but at last the Tsukiji Fish Market in Tokyo has breathed its last and closed up shop.

Closing on October 6, 2018 - and a huge part of Tokyo since the 1935 when it opened, the world's largest fish and seafood market has moved from its well-traveled Tokyo area to a new area - also in Tokyo.

I know... a fish market is moving from one part of Tokyo to another. Big whoop. Still people are sentimental about such things, and I get sentimentality. But this is just a building.

Beginning October 16, 208, the Toyosu Fish Market in eastern Tokyo will for all intents and porpoises be one of the largest buildings to open in Tokyo this year.

I doubt a heck of a lot will change for merchants moving from Tsukiji to Toyosu, Tsukuji vendors sold about 5-million pounds (2,267,972 kilograms) worth approximately US$28-million  - annually.

Toyosu hopes to retain the tourist-attraction flavor held by mighty Tsukiji - seriously, for anyone wanting to see the world's largest fish market in action, it just means a different route to travel. Ergo, if you want to see it, you will.

Like the old facility, there are restaurants/dining options, with pretty much all 40 of the stalls at Tsukiji now moving over to Toyosu. But... really, what you want to see are the tuna auctions where huge prices are paid for huge fish.

Tsukiji did require you to purchase a ticket in advance, but at Toyosu, you show up, you get to pick your own vantage point to see all  of the tuna auction action.

Honestly... for sight-seeing tourists, this move ain't no big deal. Still... think about the fact that you are going to a place where they want to keep the fish and seafood fresh. It's going to be cool, so dress appropriately.

Toyosu also has plans afoot to construct a hotel and hot springs for tourists. Next thing you know they'll build an oceanic disneyland-like place complete with rides and robot versions of Mizuchu (Japanese dragon and sea god) and Aquaman.

Meanwhile, back at Tsukiji, although the fish and seafood vendors have all left, there are still stalls and restaurants there at the so-called outer market.

Without the allure of Tsukiji, I would think that the outer market is going to lose a large amount of its customer base, but I would think that if the restaurants there are of a good enough quality, it would maintain its customer base.

Kanpai,
Andrew Joseph
PS: Photo by Erwan Hesry on Unsplash
PPS: Today's headline is taken from the stellar Douglas Adams book, So Long And Thanks For All The Fish. It's the fourth book in the HitchHiker's Guide To The Galaxy trilogy. The video above is from the 2005 movie. 











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