Search This Blog & Get A Rife

Showing posts with label Hirasawa Zoo. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Hirasawa Zoo. Show all posts

Thursday, October 11, 2018

Going To The Maul


Not just limited to Siegfried and Roy, a Japanese zookeeper has been mauled to death at the Hirakawa Zoo in Kagoshima this past Monday.

I know I shouldn’t make light of stuff like this, but we are talking about a wild animal that shouldn’t be kept in a zoo.

Yes… I’ve been to zoos, and enjoyed having tea opportunity to see such creatures, but I honestly believe that we shouldn’t cage such creatures. Keep’em in a wildlife preserve, sure, or in the wild where we know they aren’t liable to kill people or us liable to eliminate their domain.

Riu the white tiger—a natural genetic mutation of the more common orange and black version Bengal tiger—mauled Furusho Akira, 40, in its enclosure.

The male five-year-old Riku was born at the zoo, weighs 374 pounds and stands 1.8 meters in length.

Usually, when a death like this happens at a zoo, the animal is euthanized, but Furusho’s family asked they spare the animal, knowing how much the deceased loved the creature.

Awww. Now I feel like a jerk for making those jokes at the top of the article.

It is suspected that Furusho may have been trying to move the tiger between two cages when the attack occurred. Rules say no one is supposed to enter an enclosure until an animal has been moved.

Furusho’s neck was badly mauled, and was still alive when found, but died soon after arriving in the hospital.  

"When we found him, he was lying in the tiger's bedroom. There was blood on the ground," said Hirakawa zoo officialYamamoto Toshiaki  (surname first), according to Reuters. "It seems like he was bitten, then dragged around the room."

It is estimated that there are now several hundred of the white tigers in captivity—all born in captivity, in fact—with zero such animals in the wild. No white tigers have been seen in the wild since one was shot in 1958.

The Hirakawa zoo is home to four white tigers.

Kanpai,
Andrew Joseph